Jul

July 2016

Check our Day Camp Website at http://jacamps.wordpress.com.

Spring-Summer-Fall Hours
March 1 – October 31
Walk the trails and visit Liberty, the Bald Eagle, dawn until dusk.
Building hours: Monday through Saturday 10:00am-4:30pm; Sunday 1:00pm-4:30pm

 

For required reservations please stop by, pay online, or by phone with a credit card  (716) 569-2345.

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Emily Perlock is pictured here with a Pileated Woodpecker.

MAPS Bird Banding (All)
Saturday, July 2, 2016, 6:00am-12:00pm*
Saturday, July 16, 2016, 6:00am-12:00pm*
Monday, July 25, 2016, 6:00am-12:00pm*
All dates subject to change.  Check the Nature Center website for updates.
Pavilion on the west side of the Nature Center’s property
$ Free, donations appreciated.
Reservations are not required.

Join research ornithologists as they capture, band, and release birds, recording information for science. *Actual times may vary; the protocol requires opening the nets at dawn and monitoring birds for six hours.
Check our website for updates and date changes caused by foul weather.

MAPS stands for Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship. The data gathered during these sessions helps ornithologists understand more about longevity, breeding, and movement of bird species in our region and beyond.

Bird banding at Audubon Nature Center is made possible in part by the Northern Allegheny Conservation Association.

Please leave your four-legged friends at home. We do not allow dogs on the trails in order to provide the best possible experience for our visitors and the animals that live on the grounds.

Emily Thomas Perlock holds an Associate’s degree in Wildlife Technology from Penn State DuBois, a Bachelor’s degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Science from Penn State, and a Master’s degree in Wildlife and Fisheries Science at Penn State. She has worked as a wildlife biologist for the USFS Northern Research Station’s Forestry Sciences Laboratory in Irvine, Pa. and is currently employed as an Instructor in Wildlife Technology at Penn State DuBois. She learned how to band in 2005 and has banded over 4000 birds since. She holds a Master Banding permit and is a certified bird bander by the North American Banding Council. She established a banding program at The Arboretum at Penn State and has participated in banding programs for Audubon and the Roger Tory Peterson Institute.

Special Information: The pavilion is located on the west side of our property. The gate at the west entrance will be unlocked on bird banding days and a sign will be placed at the road. Dress for the weather, wear boots or shoes that can get muddy. If the weather is particularly foul and could endanger birds caught in the nets, banding will be rescheduled. Optional: bring binoculars and/or a camera.

Little Explorers (Children ages 3-8 and a grown-up)
Hawks, Eagles, and Owls
Saturday, July 9, 2016, 10:00am-11:30am
Nature Center multipurpose room and grounds
$8 Regular Price; $6 Friends of the Nature Center;
$6 Children ages 3-8
Reservations with payment are required by Thursday, July 7.
Little Explorers are children ages 3-8 and their grown-up, or two.
Call or click here to reserve.

During this program we have a brief lesson, go for a nature walk, come back for a snack, and make a craft. This month we’ll learn about all about birds of prey!

Birds of prey are often magnificent and captivating. We will learn about the different groups – hawks, eagles, and owls – and about some of their adaptations. From beaks to talons, these birds are exceptional hunting machines. Field marks make it easy to tell some apart and we will learn about the common ones in our area. We will go outside to see if we can spot any, go behind-the-scenes with Liberty to see her food and feathers, and make a raptor craft. We will also have a snack.
Sarah Hatfield is a naturalist at the Nature Center.

Special Information: Come prepared to go outside, we will go out rain or shine.

Raising Monarchs at The Grange (All)
Wednesday, July 13, 2016, 7:00pm-8:30pm
Fredonia Grange #1
58 West Main Street
Fredonia, NY 14063
Reservations are required by Friday, July 8, 2016.
Call or click here to reserve.

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Monarch Butterfly Caterpillars.

It is a sad fact that Monarch Butterflies are disappearing. Even worse, few Monarch caterpillars survive to become butterflies. Learn how to raise Monarch caterpillars and release the butterflies to help increase their numbers.

The Audubon Nature Center has been raising and releasing large numbers of Monarch Butterflies for ten years as part of the Monarch Butterfly Festival in August. Learn how to find Monarch eggs and caterpillars to raise to adulthood, as well as how to avoid butterfly diseases and parasites that infect the caterpillars.

Butterflies are fun to raise with kids, grandkids, or just on your own. It can also increase the local population of a butterfly that has been hard to find in recent times. Last year, there were 150% more Monarchs on their wintering ground than there were the year before. Be a part of the solution to help Monarchs continue to succeed. Learn how to raise them.

The program will be taught by Jeff Tome, a naturalist at the Nature Center who has been in charge of raising the Monarchs for the Monarch Butterfly Festival each year.

This program is the fourth of six free programs to be offered in the northern part of Chautauqua County. This outreach series is made possible by funding through a Community Benefit Grant by the Northern Chautauqua Community Foundation. These programs are designed to introduce residents in northern Chautauqua County to the types of programs offered at the Nature Center.

Special Information: Fredonia Grange #1, 58 West Main Street, Fredonia, NY 14063. (Parking can be found behind the building.)

Raising Monarchs (All)
Thursday, July 14, 2016, 7:00pm-8:30pm
Nature Center multipurpose room & grounds
$16 Regular Price; $12 Friends of the Nature Center;
$12 Children 3-15; Free children 2 & under
Reservations are required by
Friday, July 8, 2016.
Call or click here to reserve.

It is a sad fact that Monarch Butterflies are disappearing. Even worse, few Monarch caterpillars survive to become butterflies. Learn how to raise Monarch caterpillars and release the butterflies to help increase their numbers.

The Audubon Nature Center has been raising and releasing large numbers of Monarch Butterflies for ten years as part of the Monarch Butterfly Festival in August. Learn how to find Monarch eggs and caterpillars to raise to adulthood, as well as how to avoid butterfly diseases and parasites that infect the caterpillars.  We will start inside looking at eggs and caterpillars, then go outside to look for them in the wild.

Butterflies are fun to raise with kids, grandkids, or just on your own. It can also increase the local population of a butterfly that has been hard to find in recent times. Last year, there were 150% more Monarchs on their wintering ground than there were the year before. Be a part of the solution to help Monarchs continue to succeed. Learn how to raise them.

The program will be taught by Jeff Tome, a naturalist at the Nature Center who has been in charge of raising the Monarchs for the Monarch Butterfly Festival each year.

Special Information: Dress for the weather, including application of insect repellent if desired.

PrintWild 5K
Saturday, July 30, 2016, 9:00am-10:30am
Audubon Nature Center
$20 Regular Price*; $18 Friends of the Nature Center*;
Free children’s events
*Reservations are not required but participants registering after Monday, July 18 until race day pay $25 Regular Price; $22.50 Friends of the Nature Center and do NOT receive a t-shirt.

Register on line with Trackqua at https://runsignup.com/Race/NY/Jamestown/AudubonsWild5K

The Audubon Nature Center is excited to announce the 2016 Wild 5K. This year’s trail run/walk will highlight the woodlands that shade the trails and support their conservation.

Along the twists and turns, you may notice that some of the areas have young trees, some gnarly old ones. In some places they are primarily hemlock, other places maple, pine and beech. Not only are the tree types diverse, but so is the soil where they put down roots. There are wet woods and upland areas and even delightful, hidden vernal ponds where salamanders and frogs congregate in the spring.

26640744004_3219d0d148_oThroughout the years, Audubon Nature Center has carefully protected this unique property, opening an educational window into the importance of maintaining a wooded sanctuary for all. We hope that this year’s race will serve to raise awareness of the importance of forest habitats and to support our preservation, maintenance, and restoration efforts. One hundred years ago the American Chestnuts virtually disappeared from the forest, and now several other species could experience the same fate. Eastern Hemlocks, ashes and American Beech trees all face significant threats from insects and disease. The Nature Center  has developed a Land Use Plan, but it will take volunteers and funding to implement it.

Once again this year, there are many ways you can participate, from volunteering on race day (July 30, 2016) to sponsoring the event (see our online Sponsorship Application), to registering as a runner or a walker! Please consider supporting us in this exciting endeavor. Feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns. This year’s co-chairs are volunteers Aimee Brunelle and Jeff Rupp. You can reach them using the information e-mail (info @ jamestownaudubon.org) or by leaving a message at the front desk, 716-569-2345.

Run Wild for forests!

Special Information: The Wild 5K is a trail race. It has often been said that the length of a mile in the woods isn’t really a mile at all. No two trail races—even if they claim to be the same length—are even remotely alike. The Wild 5K will be held on the flat, scenic, meandering trails of the Nature Center grounds; runners and walkers should be prepared to race on grass, dirt, pine needles, wooden footbridges, and paved trails. The route will be clearly delineated.

Click here for August programs!